web analytics
Login
Subscribe
Breaking News         Cen-Tex KC     10/23/2014     Best In Show Judge: Mrs. Lorraine Bisso     Best In Show: GCH Ehrenvogel Achy Breaky Heart     Bell County KC (2)     10/19/2014     Best In Show Judge: Mrs. Carol Tobin Murray     Best In Show: GCH Saks Winning Card     Illinois Capitol KC (2)     10/19/2014     Best In Show Judge: Mrs. Ann D. Hearn     Best In Show: GCH Kamterra's Legato     Troy KC     10/19/2014     Best In Show Judge: Shirley D. Limoges     Best In Show: CH Merry Go Round Coach Master     South Jersey KC     10/19/2014     Best In Show Judge: James Covey     Best In Show: GCH South Folk's Sweet Harmony     The AKC Canine Health Foundation Commits $268,000 to Combat Epilepsy and Hypothyroidism in Dogs I Just Can’t See Him From The Road Something In Return Have ‘Doodles’ Had Their Day? Residents Stage Public Meeting After Second American Bulldog Attack

We'll email you the stories that fanciers want to read from all around the web daily

We don't share your email address

Sudden Acquired Retinal Degeneration Syndrome (SARDS)

Over the years I’ve developed a top ten list of my most despised diseases. Those that make it to this list tend to be diseases that are untreatable, leaving me helpless to help my patient. Such is the case with Sudden Acquired Retinal Degeneration Syndrome (aka, SARDS). In addition to being untreatable, the cause of SARDS is unknown. (Note to reader: the less that is known about a disease, the longer the name of that disease.)

Muffin- the inspiration for Muffin’s Halo

What we do know about SARDS

SARDS is a disease of middle age, and approximately 60% of affected dogs are females. Any breed is susceptible, but Dachshunds, Miniature Schnauzers, Pugs, Brittany Spaniels, Malteses, Bichon Frises, and mixed-breed dogs are particularly predisposed.

SARDS affects the retinas which receive visual input and then transport this information to the brain via the optic nerve. In dogs with SARDS, the photoreceptors (rods and cones) and possibly the nerve fiber layer within the thin-layered retinas undergo degenerative changes. The end result is complete blindness. These changes are microscopic in nature- one cannot detect them by performing a basic eye exam. The diagnosis of SARDS is made based on the patient’s history, the presence of partial to complete blindness in both eyes, normal appearing retinas, and characteristic changes on an electroretinogram (ERG). The ERG is a test used to evaluate photoreceptor function and is performed by veterinarians who are specialists in ophthalmology.

It’s been theorized that SARDS is an autoimmune disease in which a misbehaving immune system attacks the body’s own normal cells. Dogs with SARDS who have received immunosuppressive therapy (the treatment of choice for autoimmune diseases) have not demonstrated any clear improvement in overall outcome compared to untreated dogs.

Symptoms

All dogs with SARDS develop complete and permanent blindness over a rapid course, typically days to weeks. Stumbling, difficulty navigating at night, and failure to track treats are the most commonly reported early symptoms of visual impairment.

During the weeks to months preceding their blindness, most SARDS-affected dogs also experience marked increases in appetite and/or thirst with subsequent weight gain and changes in urinary behavior. Testing for hormonal imbalances (diabetes mellitus, Cushing’s Disease) that classically cause these symptoms is commonly pursued and typically comes up empty. Savvy veterinarians consider the possibility of SARDS before loss of vision becomes apparent. In most cases, it is not until vision wanes that the diagnosis of SARDS becomes suspect.

Long-term outcomes for affected dogs and their human companions

When a dog develops SARDS, a significant period of adjustment is required for everyone involved. Imagine living with a newly blind dog who is begging for food, drinking incessantly, and urinating copious amounts (all that water has to go somewhere).

A study of long-term outcomes in dogs with SARDS surveyed 100 people living with SARDS-affected dogs. In addition to blindness, most of the dogs were reported to have increased thirst, urine output, and appetite along with weight gain. Increased appetite was the only one of these symptoms reported to increase over the course of one year following the SARDS diagnosis.

In this study, 22 of the 100 dogs received some sort of treatment (corticosteroids, nutritional supplements, melatonin, and/or doxycycline) for their blindness. None experienced improved vision in response to therapy.

Eighty-seven percent of the dogs were reported to have moderate to excellent navigation skills within their home environments, and 81% had moderate to excellent navigation skills within their yard environments. Of the people surveyed, 48% reported making special provisions for their dogs such as the use of baby gates, fencing, and ramps, carpeting pathways to important locations, and auditory clues or scents to signify certain locations.

Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported that the relationship with their dog actually improved after the SARDS diagnosis. The authors of the study theorized that the increased time and involvement necessary to care for a blind dog may have been responsible for enhancing the human-animal connection. Only 17% reported that the relationship with their dog worsened.

Seventy-six percent of respondents ranked the quality of their dog’s life to be moderate to excellent. Only nine dogs were reported to have a poor quality of life. Of the 100 people surveyed, 95 indicated that they would discourage euthanasia if advising others caring for dogs with SARDS. One must bear in mind that those who chose to euthanize when SARDS was diagnosed were not surveyed.

This study provides truly uplifting results. While adaptation to a dog’s loss of vision usually proceeds smoothly, when one factors in the other SARDS symptoms that accompany the blindness, the challenge to maintain quality of life for everyone involved increases significantly. Dogs and the people who love them can be amazingly adaptive creatures!

Muffin’s Halo

The photo accompanying this article is of Muffin, a Poodle with cataracts. The halo apparatus he is wearing was designed by his clever companion, Silvie as a means to allow Muffin to explore his environment without bumping his face into things. While I have no direct experience with Muffin’s Halo (I just learned of this product a couple of weeks ago), the concept is intriguing to me. My impression is that this device would significantly boost a blind dog’s confidence level, particularly one who is newly blind. If you have used this product, I would value your feedback.

Have you ever cared for a blind dog? How was the quality of your lives impacted?

Nancy Kay D.V.M.
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Author of Your Dog’s Best Health: A Dozen Reasonable Things to Expect From Your Vet
Website: http://www.speakingforspot.com
Spot’s Blog: http://www.speakingforspot.com/blog
Email: dr.kay@speakingforspot.com
Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/speakingforspot

Written by

Dr. Nancy Kay wanted to become a veterinarian for just about as long as she can remember. Her veterinary degree is from Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine, and she completed her residency training in small animal internal medicine at the University of California-Davis Veterinary School. Dr. Kay is a board certified specialist in the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and published in several professional journals and textbooks. She lectures professionally to regional and national audiences, and one of her favorite lecture topics is communication between veterinarians and their clients. Since the release of her book, Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life, Dr. Kay has lectured extensively and written numerous magazine articles on the topic of medical advocacy and veterinarian/client communication. She was a featured guest on the popular National Public Radio show, Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Dr. Kay's newest book is called, Your Dog's Best Health: A Dozen Reasonable Things to Expect From Your Vet. Her award winning blog, "Spot Speaks" is posted weekly (www.speakingforspot.com/blog). Dr. Kay was selected by the American Animal Hospital Association to receive the 2009 Hill’s Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award. This award is given annually to a veterinarian or nonveterinarian who has advanced animal welfare through extraordinary service or by furthering humane principles, education, and understanding. Dr. Kay was selected as the 2011 Leo K. Bustad Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year, an award presented every year by the American Veterinary Medical Association to a veterinarian whose work exemplifies and promotes the human animal bond. Dr. Kay has received several awards from the Dog Writer’s Association of America. Dr. Kay's personal life revolves around her husband (also a veterinarian), her three children (none of whom aspire to be veterinarians) and their menagerie of four-legged family members. When she's not writing, she spends her spare moments in the garden or riding atop her favorite horse. Dr. Kay and her husband reside in Hendersonville, North Carolina.
Comments
  • Mary Beth McManus July 22, 2014 at 2:25 PM

    I watched the video about Muffin’s Halo with her owner recently, I believe it was linked in the American Maltese Rescue group’s page. I’ve had older dogs go blind as a gradual process and they adjusted remarkably well. This device looks wonderful especially for the little dogs, and I wouldn’t hesitate to get one if the need arises in the future.

  • Post a comment